Blame Technology, Not Longer Life Spans, for Health Spending Increases, says NYTImes

But health technologies have indeed transformed the industry, allowed several developing countries immense gains in healthcare, and for most industrilizing economies, opportunity for patients and welfre states to buy into wider technology options.

See TCLab-related research on the health industry, where industrial policy plays a critical role in how cheap or expensive healthcare is. Read the award-winning book Market Menagerie by Smita Srinivas.

Also, led by Open University colleagues and others, Making Medicines in Africa, takes a closer look at Africa's diverse trends.

The books help to understand the complexity of the fast-changing health industry but also some suprising facts about the relationship between technological advance and the affordability of healthcare.

Related Content

Srinivas, S. (forthcoming, 2017) “Evolutionary Demand, Innovation, Development” in D. Nathan, S. Sarkar, and M. Tewari (Eds). Upgrading and Innovation in Global Value Chains in Asia (Cambridge University Press);

About the Book

The Routledge Companion to Planning in the Global South offers an edited collection on planning in parts of the world which, more often than not, are unrecognised or unmarked in mainstream planning texts. In doing so, its intention is not to fill a ‘gap’ that leaves this ‘mainstream’ unquestioned but to re-theorise planning from a deep understanding of ‘place’ as well as a commitment to recognise the diverse modes of practice that come within it.

Abstract Industrial welfare history presents important challenges to developmental state theories in “late” industrialization. This article expands the debate by examining how nation-states create statutory welfare by addressing institutional variety beyond markets. It is simplistic to argue linear growth of national welfare or of states autonomously regulating markets to achieve risk-mitigation. I contend that welfare institutions emerge from the state’s essential conflict and collaboration with various alternate institutions in cities and regions.

“The world urgently needs a G 20 solving global problems and investing in a global culture of cooperation. ‘Our country first’-movements are threatening stability, wealth and peace in our interdependent world.”

--DIRK MESSNER,CO-CHAIR T20, DIRECTOR OF THE GERMAN DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE / DEUTSCHES INSTITUT FÜR ENTWICKLUNGSPOLITIK (DIE)

Gateway House: T20: Thinking for G20

The T20 during

Germany’s G20 Presidency

http://www.t20germany.org/