Blame Technology, Not Longer Life Spans, for Health Spending Increases, says NYTImes

But health technologies have indeed transformed the industry, allowed several developing countries immense gains in healthcare, and for most industrilizing economies, opportunity for patients and welfre states to buy into wider technology options.

See TCLab-related research on the health industry, where industrial policy plays a critical role in how cheap or expensive healthcare is. Read the award-winning book Market Menagerie by Smita Srinivas.

Also, led by Open University colleagues and others, Making Medicines in Africa, takes a closer look at Africa's diverse trends.

The books help to understand the complexity of the fast-changing health industry but also some suprising facts about the relationship between technological advance and the affordability of healthcare.

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Some very interesting wider philosophical discussions of the intersection of methods, mult-method approaches, of bureaucracy's view of policy versus realities outside Delhi. Plenty to discuss and much to learn.  Indian STI policies have to change, most participants recognised well that the policy process, planning assumptions, and methods are surprisingly outdated and higly centralised.