Blame Technology, Not Longer Life Spans, for Health Spending Increases, says NYTImes

But health technologies have indeed transformed the industry, allowed several developing countries immense gains in healthcare, and for most industrilizing economies, opportunity for patients and welfre states to buy into wider technology options.

See TCLab-related research on the health industry, where industrial policy plays a critical role in how cheap or expensive healthcare is. Read the award-winning book Market Menagerie by Smita Srinivas.

Also, led by Open University colleagues and others, Making Medicines in Africa, takes a closer look at Africa's diverse trends.

The books help to understand the complexity of the fast-changing health industry but also some suprising facts about the relationship between technological advance and the affordability of healthcare.

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A stimulating symposium has concluded in Berlin, organised by the very able Svenja Flechtner (European University Flensburg), Jakob Hafele (University of Vienna), Martina Metzger (Institute for International Political Economy at the Berlin School of Economics and Law), Theresa Neef (Freie Universität Berlin).

Very little detail is known about how investments and industrial policy options exercised by the national and regional State within large economies such as Brazil and India are affecting industrial employment and regional socio-economic development. The TCLab “Employment and Regional Inequality (TERI)” project is a comparative analysis of technological and industrial policy choices and their impact on intersectoral and regional employment inequalities observed both in India and Brazil.

TCLab's new postdoctoral scholar Jose Ribiero and Smita Srinivas are building a program on how technological learning is manifested in three countries. We know that economic growth and concerns of employment are both linked to technological learning, but we have some hunches about why economic theory doesn't take us far enough in appreciating why the links between industry and agriculture manifest in particular ways.

Whose innovations? At what cost? The Innovation, Knowledge, and Development (IKD) Research Center had organized "Innovating for Local Health: Addressing Local Needs in a Globalised Context" on 25th April 2014 Milton Keynes.

Abstract Industrial welfare history presents important challenges to developmental state theories in “late” industrialization. This article expands the debate by examining how nation-states create statutory welfare by addressing institutional variety beyond markets. It is simplistic to argue linear growth of national welfare or of states autonomously regulating markets to achieve risk-mitigation. I contend that welfare institutions emerge from the state’s essential conflict and collaboration with various alternate institutions in cities and regions.