Brazil-India-US Technological Learning

TCLab's new postdoctoral scholar Jose Ribiero and Smita Srinivas are building a program on how technological learning is manifested in three countries. We know that economic growth and concerns of employment are both linked to technological learning, but we have some hunches about why economic theory doesn't take us far enough in appreciating why the links between industry and agriculture manifest in particular ways.

The study at the first stage is centered on the machine tools sector. Why machine tools? No country yet has industrialized without some capability in it. At the same time, the technological learning embedded in this sector travels unevenly across industry and agriculture and across urban and rural areas. We know that India, Brazil, and the US -all of which have dynamic machine tools capability-see very different outcomes of its use in agriculture and industry. With the help of M.S. candidates Christine Hui Wen and Jessica George, we are building a composite picture of productivity changes and learning prospects using engines and gear boxes in tractors and irrigation systems for instance to understand how sub-sectors of the economy are changing. Many influential studies have shown us how learning can boost both industry and agriculture. We want to study the mechanisms that connect capabilities and products to sectors and regions.

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Innovation to reduce poverty and inequalities for inclusive and sustainable development

The 13th Globelics International Conference hosted by the Ministry of Higher Education of Cuba, the University of Havana, the Higher Institute of Technologies and Applied Sciences (InSTEC) and the Ministry of Science and Technology of Cuba, in Havana from September 23rd to 25th 2015.

The discussion elaborated on themes from Smita Srinivas's Market Menagerie: Health and Development in Late Industrial States—a far-reaching analysis of technological advance and market regulation of the biotech and pharmaceutical industries in India, Brazil, China, Nigeria, and South Africa—as a springboard into the difficult responsibilities of reporting across media and cultural divides.

The discussion elaborated on themes from Smita Srinivas's Market Menagerie: Health and Development in Late Industrial States—a far-reaching analysis of technological advance and market regulation of the biotech and pharmaceutical industries in India, Brazil, China, Nigeria, and South Africa—as a springboard into the difficult responsibilities of reporting across media and cultural divides.

This article argues that the technological innovation is a contextual process whose relevance should be assessed depending on the socio-economic condition it is embedded in. Without this, technology-led economic policies (of Catch-Up varieties) are unlikely to meet the needs of most people, especially in countries where innovation and poverty reside side by side. We analyze micro-level account of the cognitive and socio-economic context within which innovations arise and argue that a process of real importance is being sidelined: the ability to innovate under 'scarcity' conditions.

TCLab's new postdoctoral scholar Jose Ribiero and Smita Srinivas are building a program on how technological learning is manifested in three countries. We know that economic growth and concerns of employment are both linked to technological learning, but we have some hunches about why economic theory doesn't take us far enough in appreciating why the links between industry and agriculture manifest in particular ways.