Brazil, US scholars, policymakers at FGV oil and gas industry conference, TCLab-FGV collaboration

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Conferência Internacional "Public Policy for Oil and Gas"

A  successful dialogue on the oil and gas industry, energy and development, and what public policy must focus on

View full conference here

 

 

The Platform of Studies on Oil and Gas Organizations at EBAPE/FGV will ran "Políticas Públicas no Setor Petrolífero e seu Impacto no Desenvolvimento Econômico e Social Brasileiro" from Thursday to Friday, December 3-4, 2015.  This international conference will feature noted speakers and presentations by students. See http://www.platformoilandgas.com.br/conference

This international conference is a result of two current projects: (1) “A Economia Política do Setor de Petróleo no Brasil”, and (2) “Governança Industrial Descentralizada no setor de Petróleo e Gás Brasileiro” (both in collaboration with and support from Faperj). The projects have the objective of studying the relationship between institutional and organizational arrangements and the development of the Brazilian petroleum industry and consolidating a group of studies. The Brazilian oil and gas industry is one of the most promising in the world. After years of investment in the Brazilian sedimentary basins, there now exists a real possibility that Brazil will play a central role in the worldwide oil industry. There are many challenges still to be faced, however, for this possibility to become a reality in the upcoming years. While the Brazilian institutional environment could be considered trustworthy, a perception of uncertainty, on the part of the sector's actors with regards to the new divided production contracts for pre-salt deposits, predominates. Overcoming these organizational and institutional challenges is fundamental for establishing a scenario for better development of the oil and gas industries in Brazil. It is these challenges on which the two projects are focused. The theme of the conference aims to further the understanding that the current biggest barrier is the capacity of the country to successfully manage the transition from an oil-importing country to a country rich in the resource and potentially, an exporter. These change substantially affects the political, economic, and institutional structure of the country.

email: info@platformoilandgas.com.br

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