Developing Countries and Innovation: Searching for a New Analytical Approach

This article argues that the technological innovation is a contextual process whose relevance should be assessed depending on the socio-economic condition it is embedded in. Without this, technology-led economic policies (of Catch-Up varieties) are unlikely to meet the needs of most people, especially in countries where innovation and poverty reside side by side. We analyze micro-level account of the cognitive and socio-economic context within which innovations arise and argue that a process of real importance is being sidelined: the ability to innovate under 'scarcity' conditions. In this process, idiosyncratic innovative paths are followed, which we argue have been least theorized and which may provide solutions for urgent and otherwise unsolved problems. We sketch a scarcity-induced innovation framework to analyze such paths and provide a brief account of institutional aspects of planning and policy in this approach.

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About the Book

The Routledge Companion to Planning in the Global South offers an edited collection on planning in parts of the world which, more often than not, are unrecognised or unmarked in mainstream planning texts. In doing so, its intention is not to fill a ‘gap’ that leaves this ‘mainstream’ unquestioned but to re-theorise planning from a deep understanding of ‘place’ as well as a commitment to recognise the diverse modes of practice that come within it.

There is historical evidence linking waves of migration with the fortunes of nations in different industries.  Post WWII German and other European immigration to the US and the subsequent boom in several sectors; Indian immigration of professional classes of doctors and engineers to the US from the 1950s and then a new wave of computer industry workers later; and now also Syrian and other doctors and engineers, natural scientists and economists moving to Europe.

Sponsored by the Government of India Department of Science and Technology. NIAS and IISc host a 3-day workshop on core issues of developmental concern.

 

Some very interesting wider philosophical discussions of the intersection of methods, mult-method approaches, of bureaucracy's view of policy versus realities outside Delhi. Plenty to discuss and much to learn.  Indian STI policies have to change, most participants recognised well that the policy process, planning assumptions, and methods are surprisingly outdated and higly centralised.

The most recent Globelics Conference (October 2016) hosted by the University of Padjadajaran in Bandung, Indonesia, caught the attention of the Government of Indonesia and during the conference a meeting between Globelics and representatives from the office of the Indonesian President and from several ministries and agencies was held. This meeting has now led to a request for future cooperation from the Indonesian Government.

A stimulating symposium has concluded in Berlin, organised by the very able Svenja Flechtner (European University Flensburg), Jakob Hafele (University of Vienna), Martina Metzger (Institute for International Political Economy at the Berlin School of Economics and Law), Theresa Neef (Freie Universität Berlin).