Farms versus Firms research presented in Iowa

In 2016 two talks were given in the US's agricultural heartland, Iowa. Iowa is the hub for biotech research and economic development pressures in "new" manufacturing.

The talks were held in the Urban and Regional Planning program at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, and at the City and Community Planning program at the Iowa State University of Science and Technology in Ames.

 

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