Globelics In Cuba

Innovation to reduce poverty and inequalities for inclusive and sustainable development

The 13th Globelics International Conference hosted by the Ministry of Higher Education of Cuba, the University of Havana, the Higher Institute of Technologies and Applied Sciences (InSTEC) and the Ministry of Science and Technology of Cuba, in Havana from September 23rd to 25th 2015.

Like previous Globelics Conferences, this conference intends  brought together scholars from different disciplines to enhance the quality of innovation studies in relation to development and growth in the context of globalization and accelerating pace of change. The conference will combine presentation of research papers in parallel tracks with poster presentation, panel discussions and plenary lectures.

This year’s key note lectures were given by the world leading scholar on innovation and development, Richard R. Nelson from Columbia University (the 2015 Freeman Lecture) and Executive Director at Colombian Observatory of Science and Technology, Monica Salazar (the 2015 Globelics Lecture).

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