IDS-SPRU Workshop on Inclusive Structural Change

Pathways to Inclusive Development through Innovation, Technology and Change

Traditional theories of economic development consider trade and Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) as the main channels for international technology transfer to occur, building up the stock of knowledge and technology of local manufacturing firms in developing countries. While these elements are undoubtedly important, a more holistic understanding is needed of the pathways through which innovation (in product, process, organisation and market) contributes to economic development, and the implications for poverty and inequality.

In exploring how to exploit innovation to lead to both structural change and economic inclusion, or “inclusive structural change”, this unique collaboration between IDS and the Science Policy Research Unit (SPRU) aims to provide a better understanding of innovation pathways that ensure autonomous, sustainable and inclusive growth, along with poverty reduction at scale

The research team will develop conceptual and measurement frameworks, as well as carrying out an extensive review on existing literature on how technology transfer allows technological upgrading in domestic firms, and a review of case studies of technological innovation, structural change and inclusion.

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In 2014, TCLab research was presented by TCLab Visiting Fellow Jose Eustaquio Vieira Filho at the Globelics conference on the economics of innovation in Addis Ababa.

In 2015, Srinivas and TCLab Visiting Fellow Filho's early paper was published by IPEA, the Institute for Applied Economics Research

With some two-thirds of India’s GDP coming from the urban areas, cities are the driving force of the country’s economy. This trend is set to increase as the country undergoes a massive urban transformation where, within a span of thirty years, its urban population is expected to double - from 288 million in 2000 to 590 million by 2030 – making up some 40 percent of India’s people. How India manages this urbanization - the second largest in the world after China’s - will largely determine the shape of the future for its more than a billion people.

 

 

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