Inclusive Cities Workshop - June 7-8, 2011 in New Delhi

With some two-thirds of India’s GDP coming from the urban areas, cities are the driving force of the country’s economy. This trend is set to increase as the country undergoes a massive urban transformation where, within a span of thirty years, its urban population is expected to double - from 288 million in 2000 to 590 million by 2030 – making up some 40 percent of India’s people. How India manages this urbanization - the second largest in the world after China’s - will largely determine the shape of the future for its more than a billion people.

 

 

Prof. Smita Srinivas, Director of TCLab, presented on Indian Urban Planning: Challenges to Inclusive Growth and Governance

To learn more, visit:http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/COUNTRIES/SOUTHASIAEXT/0,,conte...

 

And check out the Inclusive Cities Youtube channel.

 

Cohosted by the Self Employed Women’s Association of India (SEWA), the Indian Institute for Human Settlements (IIHS), the UK government’s DFID and the World Bank.

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