Innovation for every child UNICEF's SOWC 2015

 

UNICEF 2015: Around the world, an innovation revolution for children is growing – often in the most unexpected places – and increasingly led by young people themselves.

 

Fueled by creativity, connectivity, and collaboration, new ways of solving problems are emerging – in tech design studios and university laboratories, in development organizations and corporations, and in kitchens and community centres.

 

To mark the 25th anniversary of the Convention of the Rights of the Child, this edition of The State of the World’s Children highlights the work of remarkable young innovators who are already reimagining the future – and invites the world to join this rising movement to advance the rights of every child.

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“Scarcity-induced innovations should not be equated with ‘appropriate technologies’ or products of ‘frugal engineering’, ‘reverse engineering’ or other such frameworks.”

Technological innovations can transform the lives of those who are able to take advantage of them. But many children, particularly in developing countries, remain excluded from their benefits. Reorienting innovation towards inclusion begins with recognizing unconventional pathways to innovation

UNICEF SOWC 2015 (Srinivas)

"For most, the match ends when the Sun goes down, but in the Morro da Mineira favela, in Rio de Janeiro, play can continue long into the night, thanks to lights powered by the players themselves.

The six LED floodlights surrounding the field are powered by 200 kinetic tiles buried under the Astroturf, which capture the energy generated by the players' footsteps.

As players put weight on the tiles beneath the pitch, it causes electric-magnetic induction generators to kick in and generate electricity."

Image copyright PaveGen

 

 

 

About the Book

The Routledge Companion to Planning in the Global South offers an edited collection on planning in parts of the world which, more often than not, are unrecognised or unmarked in mainstream planning texts. In doing so, its intention is not to fill a ‘gap’ that leaves this ‘mainstream’ unquestioned but to re-theorise planning from a deep understanding of ‘place’ as well as a commitment to recognise the diverse modes of practice that come within it.

The Necessary Elements of African Health and Health Industries.

Mackintosh, Banda, Tibandebage and Wame (Eds) and Chapter authors discuss the complexities and necessary conditions for better health for Africans.

Market Menagerie examines technological advance and market regulation in the health industries of nations such as India, Brazil, South Africa, Nigeria, and China. Pharmaceutical and life science industries can reinforce economic development and industry growth, but not necessarily positive health outcomes. Yet well-crafted industrial and health policies can strengthen each other and reconcile economic and social goals.