Making Medicines in Africa

The Necessary Elements of African Health and Health Industries.

Mackintosh, Banda, Tibandebage and Wame (Eds) and Chapter authors discuss the complexities and necessary conditions for better health for Africans.

Smita Srinivas contributes chapter "Healthy Industries, Unhealthy Populations" on problem-solving in health and lessons from industrial regulation and market variety in India.(Market Menagerie)

The Political Economy of Industrializing for Local Health

This book is open access under a CC-BY license. The importance of the pharmaceutical industry in Sub-Saharan Africa, its claim to policy priority, is rooted in the vast unmet health needs of the sub-continent. Making Medicines in Africa is a collective endeavour, by a group of contributors with a strong African and more broadly Southern presence, to find ways to link technological development, investment and industrial growth in pharmaceuticals to improve access to essential good quality medicines, as part of moving towards universal access to competent health care in Africa. The authors aim to shift the emphasis in international debate and initiatives towards sustained Africa-based and African-led initiatives to tackle this huge challenge. Without the technological, industrial, intellectual, organisational and research-related capabilities associated with competent pharmaceutical production, and without policies that pull the industrial sectors towards serving local health needs, the African sub-continent cannot generate the resources to tackle its population’s needs and demands.

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Srinivas, S. (forthcoming, 2017) “Evolutionary Demand, Innovation, Development” in D. Nathan, S. Sarkar, and M. Tewari (Eds). Upgrading and Innovation in Global Value Chains in Asia (Cambridge University Press);

Where is transnational trade determined? An analysis of development priorities and EU-India trade pacts

The Indo-Swiss Scholars' Exchange Grant, Funded by: The Indian Council of Social Science Research (ICSSR)

Indo-Swiss Joint Research Programme in the Social Sciences

Whose innovations? At what cost? The Innovation, Knowledge, and Development (IKD) Research Center had organized "Innovating for Local Health: Addressing Local Needs in a Globalised Context" on 25th April 2014 Milton Keynes.