Manufacturing Value Addition or Ecological nightmare? almost 96% of mobile phones sold in India locally manufactured

The Economic Times reporting on an industry analysis study, estimates that Making locally in the mobile handset industry might be almost entirely domestic by 2020. Whether or not this is a good thing deserves debate, at a time when various studies point to an ecological nightmare in tech-intensive cities and countries, India high among them. These cities are drowning in waste, and toxic electronic waste at that (see The Guardian report ).

The Economic Times Report focuses on value addition in manufacturing, a crucial element of the Make in India industrial policy but which has serious ecological and hazardous labour implications..

NEW DELHI: By 2020, almost 96 per cent of mobile phones sold in India will be locally manufactured, according to a research report.

India is set to increase its domestic localisation rate, says the report titled 'Indian Mobile Phone market: Emerging Opportunities for fulfilling India's Digital Economy Dream', released by Enixta, an artificial intelligence company, and Internet & Mobile Association of India (IAMAI). In 2016, two out of every three mobile phones sold in India w ..

Read more at:
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/59883293.cms?utm_source=contentofinterest&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=cppst

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