No Global South in Economic Development, Smita Srinivas (2017, forthcoming)

Smita Srinivas (forthcoming, 2017) "No Global South in Economic Development" in G. Bhan, S. Srinivas, V. Watson (Eds.) Routledge Companion to Planning in the Global South (Routledge) argues that we may have overused the label "Global South" to make sweeping arguments about developing countries that are not quite proven by the evidence. Countries, regions, and sectors have pulled away across the developing world, so is there  shared "South"? Are we asking too little of public governance and the state in development outcomes?

The Routledge Companion to Planning in the Global South due out in 2017

https://www.routledge.com/The-Routledge-Companion-to-Planning-in-the-Glo...

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