The Open University opens a most stimulating workshop on knowledge and development

Whose innovations? At what cost? The Innovation, Knowledge, and Development (IKD) Research Center had organized "Innovating for Local Health: Addressing Local Needs in a Globalised Context" on 25th April 2014 Milton Keynes. It was an opportunity to interact with a most stimulating set of speakers and issues at the Open University, UK, one of the leading development centres for research, teaching, and debate on global development policy issues.

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