From Scarcity to Solutions

“Scarcity-induced innovations should not be equated with ‘appropriate technologies’ or products of ‘frugal engineering’, ‘reverse engineering’ or other such frameworks.”

Technological innovations can transform the lives of those who are able to take advantage of them. But many children, particularly in developing countries, remain excluded from their benefits. Reorienting innovation towards inclusion begins with recognizing unconventional pathways to innovation

UNICEF SOWC 2015 (Srinivas)

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“The world urgently needs a G 20 solving global problems and investing in a global culture of cooperation. ‘Our country first’-movements are threatening stability, wealth and peace in our interdependent world.”

--DIRK MESSNER,CO-CHAIR T20, DIRECTOR OF THE GERMAN DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE / DEUTSCHES INSTITUT FÜR ENTWICKLUNGSPOLITIK (DIE)

Gateway House: T20: Thinking for G20

The T20 during

Germany’s G20 Presidency

http://www.t20germany.org/

About the Book

The Routledge Companion to Planning in the Global South offers an edited collection on planning in parts of the world which, more often than not, are unrecognised or unmarked in mainstream planning texts. In doing so, its intention is not to fill a ‘gap’ that leaves this ‘mainstream’ unquestioned but to re-theorise planning from a deep understanding of ‘place’ as well as a commitment to recognise the diverse modes of practice that come within it.

This article argues that the technological innovation is a contextual process whose relevance should be assessed depending on the socio-economic condition it is embedded in. Without this, technology-led economic policies (of Catch-Up varieties) are unlikely to meet the needs of most people, especially in countries where innovation and poverty reside side by side. We analyze micro-level account of the cognitive and socio-economic context within which innovations arise and argue that a process of real importance is being sidelined: the ability to innovate under 'scarcity' conditions.

Abstract Industrial welfare history presents important challenges to developmental state theories in “late” industrialization. This article expands the debate by examining how nation-states create statutory welfare by addressing institutional variety beyond markets. It is simplistic to argue linear growth of national welfare or of states autonomously regulating markets to achieve risk-mitigation. I contend that welfare institutions emerge from the state’s essential conflict and collaboration with various alternate institutions in cities and regions.