From Scarcity to Solutions

“Scarcity-induced innovations should not be equated with ‘appropriate technologies’ or products of ‘frugal engineering’, ‘reverse engineering’ or other such frameworks.”

Technological innovations can transform the lives of those who are able to take advantage of them. But many children, particularly in developing countries, remain excluded from their benefits. Reorienting innovation towards inclusion begins with recognizing unconventional pathways to innovation

UNICEF SOWC 2015 (Srinivas)

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Srinivas, S. (forthcoming, 2017) “Evolutionary Demand, Innovation, Development” in D. Nathan, S. Sarkar, and M. Tewari (Eds). Upgrading and Innovation in Global Value Chains in Asia (Cambridge University Press);