Who works at TLab? A conceptual difference

Meet Jessica George, former aerospace engineer and M.S. candidate at the Urban Planning program at GSAPP. At TCLab our researchers' backgrounds boost their understanding of how economies change. Their training and commitment can bridge technological and industrial transformation to topics on urban and regional employment, health, and social protections.

On our Brazil-India study of machine tool sectors for example, we have Columbia graduate students including Jessica, and TCLab postdoctoral visiting scholars who bring economics, physics, and engineering backgrounds to urban and regional economic development.

Jessica George is currently pursuing her MS in Urban Planning at GSAPP with a focus on international economic development.  Her research interests include investigating the role of industrial and technological policies in economic and social development, as well as the relationships and interactions between government, private entities, and civil society. Prior to this, Jessica worked as a systems engineer in the aerospace industry for several years.  She holds both a BS and an MS in Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics from Drexel University.

Jessica George is an example of why multi-disciplinary perspectives are helpful to urban and regional economic plans, without diluting either her engineering experience or her economic development specialization in Urban Planning.

Another example at TCLab is Christine Wen who has an undergraduate degree in physics from Princeton University and is currently focused on international economic development for an M.S. in the Urban Planning program.

At TCLab, it seems it isn't enough to study technological learning, we try to embed it into the ways in which we do research and to bring our own training into the larger picture.

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