Work in Waste: Technology, Infrastructure, Politics

Smita Srinivas and Saku Makinen have been studying the utility of different technology transfer waste processing and absorptive capacity frameworks to see whether Finnish waste technology firms can adapt to waste processing contexts outside of Finland. Former TCLab Program Manager  May Yu recently completed her thesis research studying the complexities of this process in Brazil. In the thesis "Protecting Local Livelihoods in Urban Sustainable Development: Environment-Employment Tradeoffs of Jardim Gramacho in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil", Yu raises some questions for how decentralized industrial issues in waste processing are often left out of the urban and regional planning context. Employment and health concerns make a suitable response urgent, and Yu's research shows us a way forward.

These concerns are shared by Chintan Environmental Research and Action Group, India. Chintan has been involved in some important work with informal waste processing workers and the missing “Space for Waste” in spatial planning.

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