World Cities Summit: Will Mayors Rule the World?

The challenges of running economic governance via the nation-state are many. Especially in a world where technological change is moving about the institutions and production sites we have taken as the foundation of these nation-states.

City and Regional governments are becoming more important (in some cases again), especially evident in the EU, in South Asia, and in famed examples such as secession-prone Quebec or new sub-national states such as Telengana.

It may be some time before Mayors rule the world, but Mayors and Governors are still often future Presidents in Mexico and Brazil, and and therefore noteworthy. However, in South Asia, epsecially in India, Chief Ministers who head up sub-national governments, and Municipal Commissioners -part of the executive, may carry more economic weight and administrative authority than politically elected Mayors.

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The Open University and the Science Policy Research Unit, Univ of Sussex, UK co-organized a vibrant workshop in February 2017 in Brighton, UK.

Smita Srinivas played a co-organizer role alongside the leads Prof. Maureen Mackintosh (Economics, IKD, Open University), and Prof. Joanna Chataway (S&T policy, SPRU)

The workshop drew participants from the UK, Ghana, Kenya, Tanzania, and India.

Srinivas, S. (forthcoming, 2017) “Evolutionary Demand, Innovation, Development” in D. Nathan, S. Sarkar, and M. Tewari (Eds). Upgrading and Innovation in Global Value Chains in Asia (Cambridge University Press);

TCLab's new postdoctoral scholar Jose Ribiero and Smita Srinivas are building a program on how technological learning is manifested in three countries. We know that economic growth and concerns of employment are both linked to technological learning, but we have some hunches about why economic theory doesn't take us far enough in appreciating why the links between industry and agriculture manifest in particular ways.