Basic Needs

“Scarcity-induced innovations should not be equated with ‘appropriate technologies’ or products of ‘frugal engineering’, ‘reverse engineering’ or other such frameworks.”

Technological innovations can transform the lives of those who are able to take advantage of them. But many children, particularly in developing countries, remain excluded from their benefits. Reorienting innovation towards inclusion begins with recognizing unconventional pathways to innovation

UNICEF SOWC 2015 (Srinivas)

 

UNICEF 2015: Around the world, an innovation revolution for children is growing – often in the most unexpected places – and increasingly led by young people themselves.

 

Fueled by creativity, connectivity, and collaboration, new ways of solving problems are emerging – in tech design studios and university laboratories, in development organizations and corporations, and in kitchens and community centres.

 

"For most, the match ends when the Sun goes down, but in the Morro da Mineira favela, in Rio de Janeiro, play can continue long into the night, thanks to lights powered by the players themselves.

The six LED floodlights surrounding the field are powered by 200 kinetic tiles buried under the Astroturf, which capture the energy generated by the players' footsteps.

As players put weight on the tiles beneath the pitch, it causes electric-magnetic induction generators to kick in and generate electricity."

Image copyright PaveGen

 

 

 

Pathways to Inclusive Development through Innovation, Technology and Change

The Open University and the Science Policy Research Unit, Univ of Sussex, UK co-organized a vibrant workshop in February 2017 in Brighton, UK.

Smita Srinivas played a co-organizer role alongside the leads Prof. Maureen Mackintosh (Economics, IKD, Open University), and Prof. Joanna Chataway (S&T policy, SPRU)

The workshop drew participants from the UK, Ghana, Kenya, Tanzania, and India.

Countries are unlikely to solve a particular problem unless they have some level of research invested in the effort. The approach in this paper is to use malaria research as a proxy for effective exploitation of local scientific knowledge. We study the malaria-related research output in two countries, Brazil and India, with among the most advanced science and pharmaceutical capabilities in the developing world. We assess local relevance of science and also its integration with international research by looking at almost 60 years of scientific publications on malaria between 1945-2003.

Whose innovations? At what cost? The Innovation, Knowledge, and Development (IKD) Research Center had organized "Innovating for Local Health: Addressing Local Needs in a Globalised Context" on 25th April 2014 Milton Keynes.

The Necessary Elements of African Health and Health Industries.

Mackintosh, Banda, Tibandebage and Wame (Eds) and Chapter authors discuss the complexities and necessary conditions for better health for Africans.

“The world urgently needs a G 20 solving global problems and investing in a global culture of cooperation. ‘Our country first’-movements are threatening stability, wealth and peace in our interdependent world.”

--DIRK MESSNER,CO-CHAIR T20, DIRECTOR OF THE GERMAN DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE / DEUTSCHES INSTITUT FÜR ENTWICKLUNGSPOLITIK (DIE)

Gateway House: T20: Thinking for G20

The T20 during

Germany’s G20 Presidency

http://www.t20germany.org/

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