Conceptual Frameworks

A stimulating symposium has concluded in Berlin, organised by the very able Svenja Flechtner (European University Flensburg), Jakob Hafele (University of Vienna), Martina Metzger (Institute for International Political Economy at the Berlin School of Economics and Law), Theresa Neef (Freie Universität Berlin).

But health technologies have indeed transformed the industry, allowed several developing countries immense gains in healthcare, and for most industrilizing economies, opportunity for patients and welfre states to buy into wider technology options.

See TCLab-related research on the health industry, where industrial policy plays a critical role in how cheap or expensive healthcare is. Read the award-winning book Market Menagerie by Smita Srinivas.

Africa's industrialization and rapid urbanization, UNECA 2017 launch event, Dakar.

 
 

 

Meet Jessica George, former aerospace engineer and M.S. candidate at the Urban Planning program at GSAPP. At TCLab our researchers' backgrounds boost their understanding of how economies change. Their training and commitment can bridge technological and industrial transformation to topics on urban and regional employment, health, and social protections.

Market Menagerie examines technological advance and market regulation in the health industries of nations such as India, Brazil, South Africa, Nigeria, and China. Pharmaceutical and life science industries can reinforce economic development and industry growth, but not necessarily positive health outcomes. Yet well-crafted industrial and health policies can strengthen each other and reconcile economic and social goals.

The most recent Globelics Conference (October 2016) hosted by the University of Padjadajaran in Bandung, Indonesia, caught the attention of the Government of Indonesia and during the conference a meeting between Globelics and representatives from the office of the Indonesian President and from several ministries and agencies was held. This meeting has now led to a request for future cooperation from the Indonesian Government.

This is a controversial and troubling question for nations and citizens (especially if they are feeling insecure). But daily reality brings more important questions than this: the need to find food, shelter, and preserve or improve one’s health. “Development” in the abstract is a little distracting if it doesn’t speak directly to these essential concerns. Are developed societies those with healthy citizens and residents?

This article argues that the technological innovation is a contextual process whose relevance should be assessed depending on the socio-economic condition it is embedded in. Without this, technology-led economic policies (of Catch-Up varieties) are unlikely to meet the needs of most people, especially in countries where innovation and poverty reside side by side. We analyze micro-level account of the cognitive and socio-economic context within which innovations arise and argue that a process of real importance is being sidelined: the ability to innovate under 'scarcity' conditions.

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