Innovations

Theo Papaioannou and Smita Srinivas

analyze value-neutrality more closely among 'Schools' of neo-Schumpeterian evolutionary scholars.

 

 

Countries are unlikely to solve a particular problem unless they have some level of research invested in the effort. The approach in this paper is to use malaria research as a proxy for effective exploitation of local scientific knowledge. We study the malaria-related research output in two countries, Brazil and India, with among the most advanced science and pharmaceutical capabilities in the developing world. We assess local relevance of science and also its integration with international research by looking at almost 60 years of scientific publications on malaria between 1945-2003.

A preventive HIV vaccine offers the best hope for ending the AIDS pandemic. Scientific evidence suggests that an HIV vaccine is possible, and funding for HIV vaccine research and development (R&D) has increased substantially in recent years. The speed of progress toward an HIV vaccine will depend on the management of the effort as well as on its scale, however, and organizational issues have been the subject of vigorous debate.

Whose innovations? At what cost? The Innovation, Knowledge, and Development (IKD) Research Center had organized "Innovating for Local Health: Addressing Local Needs in a Globalised Context" on 25th April 2014 Milton Keynes.

Conferência Internacional "Public Policy for Oil and Gas"

A  successful dialogue on the oil and gas industry, energy and development, and what public policy must focus on

View full conference here

 

 

Market Menagerie examines technological advance and market regulation in the health industries of nations such as India, Brazil, South Africa, Nigeria, and China. Pharmaceutical and life science industries can reinforce economic development and industry growth, but not necessarily positive health outcomes. Yet well-crafted industrial and health policies can strengthen each other and reconcile economic and social goals.

The most recent Globelics Conference (October 2016) hosted by the University of Padjadajaran in Bandung, Indonesia, caught the attention of the Government of Indonesia and during the conference a meeting between Globelics and representatives from the office of the Indonesian President and from several ministries and agencies was held. This meeting has now led to a request for future cooperation from the Indonesian Government.

Innovation to reduce poverty and inequalities for inclusive and sustainable development

The 13th Globelics International Conference hosted by the Ministry of Higher Education of Cuba, the University of Havana, the Higher Institute of Technologies and Applied Sciences (InSTEC) and the Ministry of Science and Technology of Cuba, in Havana from September 23rd to 25th 2015.

This article argues that the technological innovation is a contextual process whose relevance should be assessed depending on the socio-economic condition it is embedded in. Without this, technology-led economic policies (of Catch-Up varieties) are unlikely to meet the needs of most people, especially in countries where innovation and poverty reside side by side. We analyze micro-level account of the cognitive and socio-economic context within which innovations arise and argue that a process of real importance is being sidelined: the ability to innovate under 'scarcity' conditions.

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