Blame Technology, Not Longer Life Spans, for Health Spending Increases, says NYTImes

But health technologies have indeed transformed the industry, allowed several developing countries immense gains in healthcare, and for most industrilizing economies, opportunity for patients and welfre states to buy into wider technology options.

See TCLab-related research on the health industry, where industrial policy plays a critical role in how cheap or expensive healthcare is. Read the award-winning book Market Menagerie by Smita Srinivas.

Also, led by Open University colleagues and others, Making Medicines in Africa, takes a closer look at Africa's diverse trends.

The books help to understand the complexity of the fast-changing health industry but also some suprising facts about the relationship between technological advance and the affordability of healthcare.

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TCLab's new postdoctoral scholar Jose Ribiero and Smita Srinivas are building a program on how technological learning is manifested in three countries. We know that economic growth and concerns of employment are both linked to technological learning, but we have some hunches about why economic theory doesn't take us far enough in appreciating why the links between industry and agriculture manifest in particular ways.

At African Development Week in Dakar, Senegal, Smita Srinivas, spoke to CNBC Africa about the effect of a lack of coordination between urbanisation and industrialisation.

 

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The Indian Institute of Science's 12th Dec panel, "Science Technology Innovation impact on Socio-economic Development" has Prof. Pranav Desai, Prof. Smita Srinivas, Prof. Sundar Sarukkai, Dr. Gayathri Sabharwal, and Dr. Satya Prakash Dash. The workshop runs from the 11th to the 13th December 2017.

There is historical evidence linking waves of migration with the fortunes of nations in different industries.  Post WWII German and other European immigration to the US and the subsequent boom in several sectors; Indian immigration of professional classes of doctors and engineers to the US from the 1950s and then a new wave of computer industry workers later; and now also Syrian and other doctors and engineers, natural scientists and economists moving to Europe.