Innovation for every child UNICEF's SOWC 2015

 

UNICEF 2015: Around the world, an innovation revolution for children is growing – often in the most unexpected places – and increasingly led by young people themselves.

 

Fueled by creativity, connectivity, and collaboration, new ways of solving problems are emerging – in tech design studios and university laboratories, in development organizations and corporations, and in kitchens and community centres.

 

To mark the 25th anniversary of the Convention of the Rights of the Child, this edition of The State of the World’s Children highlights the work of remarkable young innovators who are already reimagining the future – and invites the world to join this rising movement to advance the rights of every child.

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