Migration: OECD 2017 Global Perspectives on Development

There is historical evidence linking waves of migration with the fortunes of nations in different industries.  Post WWII German and other European immigration to the US and the subsequent boom in several sectors; Indian immigration of professional classes of doctors and engineers to the US from the 1950s and then a new wave of computer industry workers later; and now also Syrian and other doctors and engineers, natural scientists and economists moving to Europe.

The new OCED report covers a lot of ground. Read it with a close eye to trends of skill, investment, decimation in some cases of home economies, as well as opportunities for new industry cycles elsewhere.

Related Content

A new chapter is out in a new book. Smita Srinivas (2018), “Evolutionary Demand, Innovation, and Development” in  D. Nathan, S. Sarkar, and M.  Tewari (Eds.) Development with Global Value Chains: Upgrading and Innovation in Asia, Cambridge University Press.

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"For most, the match ends when the Sun goes down, but in the Morro da Mineira favela, in Rio de Janeiro, play can continue long into the night, thanks to lights powered by the players themselves.

The six LED floodlights surrounding the field are powered by 200 kinetic tiles buried under the Astroturf, which capture the energy generated by the players' footsteps.

As players put weight on the tiles beneath the pitch, it causes electric-magnetic induction generators to kick in and generate electricity."

Image copyright PaveGen

 

 

 

About the Book

The Routledge Companion to Planning in the Global South offers an edited collection on planning in parts of the world which, more often than not, are unrecognised or unmarked in mainstream planning texts. In doing so, its intention is not to fill a ‘gap’ that leaves this ‘mainstream’ unquestioned but to re-theorise planning from a deep understanding of ‘place’ as well as a commitment to recognise the diverse modes of practice that come within it.

But health technologies have indeed transformed the industry, allowed several developing countries immense gains in healthcare, and for most industrilizing economies, opportunity for patients and welfre states to buy into wider technology options.

See TCLab-related research on the health industry, where industrial policy plays a critical role in how cheap or expensive healthcare is. Read the award-winning book Market Menagerie by Smita Srinivas.