No Global South in Economic Development, Smita Srinivas (2018, forthcoming)

 

The Routledge Companion to Planning in the Global South due out in 2018

https://www.routledge.com/The-Routledge-Companion-to-Planning-in-the-Glo...

Smita Srinivas (forthcoming, 2018) "No Global South in Economic Development" in G. Bhan, S. Srinivas, V. Watson (Eds.) Routledge Companion to Planning in the Global South (Routledge) argues that we may have overused the label "Global South" to make sweeping arguments about developing countries that are not quite proven by the evidence. Countries, regions, and sectors have pulled away across the developing world, so is there  shared "South"? Are we asking too little of public governance and the state in development outcomes?

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“The world urgently needs a G 20 solving global problems and investing in a global culture of cooperation. ‘Our country first’-movements are threatening stability, wealth and peace in our interdependent world.”

--DIRK MESSNER,CO-CHAIR T20, DIRECTOR OF THE GERMAN DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE / DEUTSCHES INSTITUT FÜR ENTWICKLUNGSPOLITIK (DIE)

Gateway House: T20: Thinking for G20

The T20 during

Germany’s G20 Presidency

http://www.t20germany.org/

With great pleasure we share a new 2018 book by former TCLab Fellow Jose Eustaquio Vieira Filho and the esteemed Albert Fishlow:  "Agriculture and industry in Brazil: innovation and competitiveness". Published by the Institute for Applied Economics Research (IPEA)

https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6344567794872487936

From Columbia Global Centres:

Abstract Industrial welfare history presents important challenges to developmental state theories in “late” industrialization. This article expands the debate by examining how nation-states create statutory welfare by addressing institutional variety beyond markets. It is simplistic to argue linear growth of national welfare or of states autonomously regulating markets to achieve risk-mitigation. I contend that welfare institutions emerge from the state’s essential conflict and collaboration with various alternate institutions in cities and regions.

This is a controversial and troubling question for nations and citizens (especially if they are feeling insecure). But daily reality brings more important questions than this: the need to find food, shelter, and preserve or improve one’s health. “Development” in the abstract is a little distracting if it doesn’t speak directly to these essential concerns. Are developed societies those with healthy citizens and residents?