No Global South in Economic Development, Smita Srinivas (2018, forthcoming)

 

The Routledge Companion to Planning in the Global South due out in 2018

https://www.routledge.com/The-Routledge-Companion-to-Planning-in-the-Glo...

Smita Srinivas (forthcoming, 2018) "No Global South in Economic Development" in G. Bhan, S. Srinivas, V. Watson (Eds.) Routledge Companion to Planning in the Global South (Routledge) argues that we may have overused the label "Global South" to make sweeping arguments about developing countries that are not quite proven by the evidence. Countries, regions, and sectors have pulled away across the developing world, so is there  shared "South"? Are we asking too little of public governance and the state in development outcomes?

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This proposal would enable nationals working abroad to transfer knowledge and to invest in home countries. The Least Developed Countries Report 2012, subtitled Harnessing Remittances and Diaspora Knowledge to Build Productive Capacities, addresses the issue.

There is historical evidence linking waves of migration with the fortunes of nations in different industries.  Post WWII German and other European immigration to the US and the subsequent boom in several sectors; Indian immigration of professional classes of doctors and engineers to the US from the 1950s and then a new wave of computer industry workers later; and now also Syrian and other doctors and engineers, natural scientists and economists moving to Europe.

With great pleasure we share a new 2018 book by former TCLab Fellow Jose Eustaquio Vieira Filho and the esteemed Albert Fishlow:  "Agriculture and industry in Brazil: innovation and competitiveness". Published by the Institute for Applied Economics Research (IPEA)

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From Columbia Global Centres:

This article argues that the technological innovation is a contextual process whose relevance should be assessed depending on the socio-economic condition it is embedded in. Without this, technology-led economic policies (of Catch-Up varieties) are unlikely to meet the needs of most people, especially in countries where innovation and poverty reside side by side. We analyze micro-level account of the cognitive and socio-economic context within which innovations arise and argue that a process of real importance is being sidelined: the ability to innovate under 'scarcity' conditions.