The Politics of Innovation: Are neo-Schumpeterians value-Neutral?

Theo Papaioannou and Smita Srinivas

analyze value-neutrality more closely among 'Schools' of neo-Schumpeterian evolutionary scholars.

 

 

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About the Book

The Routledge Companion to Planning in the Global South offers an edited collection on planning in parts of the world which, more often than not, are unrecognised or unmarked in mainstream planning texts. In doing so, its intention is not to fill a ‘gap’ that leaves this ‘mainstream’ unquestioned but to re-theorise planning from a deep understanding of ‘place’ as well as a commitment to recognise the diverse modes of practice that come within it.

This article argues that the technological innovation is a contextual process whose relevance should be assessed depending on the socio-economic condition it is embedded in. Without this, technology-led economic policies (of Catch-Up varieties) are unlikely to meet the needs of most people, especially in countries where innovation and poverty reside side by side. We analyze micro-level account of the cognitive and socio-economic context within which innovations arise and argue that a process of real importance is being sidelined: the ability to innovate under 'scarcity' conditions.

A new chapter is out in a new book. Smita Srinivas (2018), “Evolutionary Demand, Innovation, and Development” in  D. Nathan, S. Sarkar, and M.  Tewari (Eds.) Development with Global Value Chains: Upgrading and Innovation in Asia, Cambridge University Press.

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But health technologies have indeed transformed the industry, allowed several developing countries immense gains in healthcare, and for most industrilizing economies, opportunity for patients and welfre states to buy into wider technology options.

See TCLab-related research on the health industry, where industrial policy plays a critical role in how cheap or expensive healthcare is. Read the award-winning book Market Menagerie by Smita Srinivas.