Srinivas (2017, forthcoming) Evolutionary Demand in Nathan et al. Upgrading and Innovation

Srinivas, S. (forthcoming, 2017) “Evolutionary Demand, Innovation, Development” in D. Nathan, S. Sarkar, and M. Tewari (Eds). Upgrading and Innovation in Global Value Chains in Asia (Cambridge University Press);

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