TCLab "Narrate" 2013 Markets, Health technologies, justice: challenges of analysis and communication

The discussion elaborated on themes from Smita Srinivas's Market Menagerie: Health and Development in Late Industrial States—a far-reaching analysis of technological advance and market regulation of the biotech and pharmaceutical industries in India, Brazil, China, Nigeria, and South Africa—as a springboard into the difficult responsibilities of reporting across media and cultural divides. See the video of the full event here http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=nMQ5YXJxNsE

Jason Cone, Médecins Sans Frontières; Stephen Mayes, VII Photo; Brian McGrath, Parsons, The New School; Patricia Thomas, U Georgia; Smita Srinivas, TCLab Columbia University GSAPP

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