Think technology is disrupting the job market like never before? Think again.

A new report

from the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation published in the Christian Science Monitor analyzes the US labor market from 1850 to the present and finds that we are in an era of unprecedented calm. And that's not good.

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"For most, the match ends when the Sun goes down, but in the Morro da Mineira favela, in Rio de Janeiro, play can continue long into the night, thanks to lights powered by the players themselves.

The six LED floodlights surrounding the field are powered by 200 kinetic tiles buried under the Astroturf, which capture the energy generated by the players' footsteps.

As players put weight on the tiles beneath the pitch, it causes electric-magnetic induction generators to kick in and generate electricity."

Image copyright PaveGen

 

 

 

This proposal would enable nationals working abroad to transfer knowledge and to invest in home countries. The Least Developed Countries Report 2012, subtitled Harnessing Remittances and Diaspora Knowledge to Build Productive Capacities, addresses the issue.

The Economic Times reporting on an industry analysis study, estimates that Making locally in the mobile handset industry might be almost entirely domestic by 2020. Whether or not this is a good thing deserves debate, at a time when various studies point to an ecological nightmare in tech-intensive cities and countries, India high among them. These cities are drowning in waste, and toxic electronic waste at that (see The Guardian report ).

There is historical evidence linking waves of migration with the fortunes of nations in different industries.  Post WWII German and other European immigration to the US and the subsequent boom in several sectors; Indian immigration of professional classes of doctors and engineers to the US from the 1950s and then a new wave of computer industry workers later; and now also Syrian and other doctors and engineers, natural scientists and economists moving to Europe.