World Cities Summit: Will Mayors Rule the World?

The challenges of running economic governance via the nation-state are many. Especially in a world where technological change is moving about the institutions and production sites we have taken as the foundation of these nation-states.

City and Regional governments are becoming more important (in some cases again), especially evident in the EU, in South Asia, and in famed examples such as secession-prone Quebec or new sub-national states such as Telengana.

It may be some time before Mayors rule the world, but Mayors and Governors are still often future Presidents in Mexico and Brazil, and and therefore noteworthy. However, in South Asia, epsecially in India, Chief Ministers who head up sub-national governments, and Municipal Commissioners -part of the executive, may carry more economic weight and administrative authority than politically elected Mayors.

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The Necessary Elements of African Health and Health Industries.

Mackintosh, Banda, Tibandebage and Wame (Eds) and Chapter authors discuss the complexities and necessary conditions for better health for Africans.

A new report

from the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation published in the Christian Science Monitor analyzes the US labor market from 1850 to the present and finds that we are in an era of unprecedented calm. And that's not good.

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With great pleasure we share a new 2018 book by former TCLab Fellow Jose Eustaquio Vieira Filho and the esteemed Albert Fishlow:  "Agriculture and industry in Brazil: innovation and competitiveness". Published by the Institute for Applied Economics Research (IPEA)

https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6344567794872487936

From Columbia Global Centres:

A stimulating symposium has concluded in Berlin, organised by the very able Svenja Flechtner (European University Flensburg), Jakob Hafele (University of Vienna), Martina Metzger (Institute for International Political Economy at the Berlin School of Economics and Law), Theresa Neef (Freie Universität Berlin).