World Cities Summit: Will Mayors Rule the World?

The challenges of running economic governance via the nation-state are many. Especially in a world where technological change is moving about the institutions and production sites we have taken as the foundation of these nation-states.

City and Regional governments are becoming more important (in some cases again), especially evident in the EU, in South Asia, and in famed examples such as secession-prone Quebec or new sub-national states such as Telengana.

It may be some time before Mayors rule the world, but Mayors and Governors are still often future Presidents in Mexico and Brazil, and and therefore noteworthy. However, in South Asia, epsecially in India, Chief Ministers who head up sub-national governments, and Municipal Commissioners -part of the executive, may carry more economic weight and administrative authority than politically elected Mayors.

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India has launched the country's first-ever Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) and is expected to reach Mars in September.

Melissa Pandika, OZY.com 10:54 a.m. EST January 29, 2014

(Photo Credits: Pallava Bagla/Corbis)

Smita Srinivas and Saku Makinen have been studying the utility of different technology transfer waste processing and absorptive capacity frameworks to see whether Finnish waste technology firms can adapt to waste processing contexts outside of Finland. Former TCLab Program Manager  May Yu recently completed her thesis research studying the complexities of this process in Brazil.

The Open University and the Science Policy Research Unit, Univ of Sussex, UK co-organized a vibrant workshop in February 2017 in Brighton, UK.

Smita Srinivas played a co-organizer role alongside the leads Prof. Maureen Mackintosh (Economics, IKD, Open University), and Prof. Joanna Chataway (S&T policy, SPRU)

The workshop drew participants from the UK, Ghana, Kenya, Tanzania, and India.

"For most, the match ends when the Sun goes down, but in the Morro da Mineira favela, in Rio de Janeiro, play can continue long into the night, thanks to lights powered by the players themselves.

The six LED floodlights surrounding the field are powered by 200 kinetic tiles buried under the Astroturf, which capture the energy generated by the players' footsteps.

As players put weight on the tiles beneath the pitch, it causes electric-magnetic induction generators to kick in and generate electricity."

Image copyright PaveGen